leslie's guiding traditions

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Prior to 1921, it was possible for Brownies to camp - either in tents, or they could take over empty buildings.  But in that year, at the Brownie conference, it was decided that Brownies should not be allowed to camp, only to stay in furnished houses.  There could be a maximum of 18 Brownies on the holiday, and a ratio of 1 adult for every 6 children, with a minimum of 2 adults.  The rules in 1924 POR were:


1) Only warranted Brown Owls may take their Packs for holidays.

2) The numbers for such a holiday should not as a rule exceed three Sixes or eighteen Brownies.

3) There should be one grown up to each Six; with a minimum of two; odd numbers in proportion.  (N.B. grown ups over 18).

4) Written health certificates should be obtained from the parents.

5) No Brownie under eight may be taken for a Pack Holiday.

6) Permission must be obtained from the Pack's own Commissioner, and the Commissioner in whose area the holiday takes place should be informed.

7) The final responsibility rests with the Commissioner, and in the event of her being unable to visit the Pack, the Brown Owl must send her a written report of the holiday.


Over many years, the rules changed little.  Advisers were appointed, Forms developed to inform them about forthcoming events, and a system of qualifications developed.  The idea of 'themes' was introduced - so that rather than just a holiday in the country, the city or by the sea, the girls would travel on an adventure, exploring activities related to the theme chosen.  The main focus was always on outdoor activities - nature trails, picnic hikes, paddling or swimming, outdoor games - with crafts and games kept in reserve in case the weather wasn't always clement.  


It was only in the 1990s that the first experimental camps were held for Brownies, prior to the introduction of permission for Brownies to camp.