leslie's guiding traditions

Click here to edit subtitle

Guiding was not long started when it became clear that there would be a need for a supply of young women who had had the training to be able to set up Guide units around the country.  So in 1916, Cadet units were set up at various girls' boarding schools.    


In the 1918 handbook it stated: 

"Why should boys have all the fun?  Why should they have Cadet Corps at their schools and the girls have none?  It has always bothered me as another injustice to girls.  So in the Guide movement we have done something to set it right by starting a Guide Cadet Corps in the greater girls' schools.  Just as for the Army a School Cadet Corps is a training corps for those who will get commissions as officers, so it is with the Guides' Cadet Corps.  The members of these are taught all the things that will enable them to become officers or 'Guiders' in the Movement when they leave school."


"The unit for Cadets is either a Patrol of eight under a Patrol Leader; or a half-Company of two Patrols commanded by a Lieutenant; or a Company of three or more Patrols under a Captain.  Age - 16 or over.  Uniform - Gymnastic uniform of the school or the Girl Guide uniform with a white hatband round the hat.  Badges - Badges of proficiency as for Guides or Senior Guides.  Training - in all the different activities as laid down for Guides, Brownies, and Senior Guides, but with the addition of practice in giving instruction in them.  A Cadet is expected as a point of honour to do her best to help in the Guide Movement after she has left school.  A certificate is awarded to a Cadet on leaving school to show to what extent she has been trained in Guide work, and a recommendation of her is sent to the Guide Commissioner of the district in which she will live so that they can mutually get in touch.  thus she will have the opportunity of doing a big thing for herself, for her sisters, and for her country."  (1918 Guide Handbook, "Girl Guiding").

 
 

1990 brought a change of uniform to a mix-and-match range, with sweatshirt or polo or t-shirt, with navy joggers, cullottes or shorts, and a baseball cap.  There was a badge tab, which for Young Leaders had white vertical stripes at either side, to distinguish it from the Ranger tab, which did not have stripes.  The Young Leader scheme was merged into the Ranger programme in the early 2000s when the Look Wider programme was introduced.